Donald Trump has one trick up his sleeve to stop any more migrant caravans

There are many magnets that attract illegal aliens to the United States.

Donald Trump is about to end one of them.

And with one stroke of his pen Trump is about to end the worst way the migrant caravan can stay in America.

Donald Trump campaigned on ending birthright citizenship for illegal aliens.

The current reading of the 14th amendment grants automatic citizenship to the children of illegal aliens if they are born in America.

Trump realized this is absurd.

He announced in an interview with Axios that he would sign an executive order ending birthright citizenship for illegal aliens.

Politico reports:

President Donald Trump said Monday that he is planning to sign an executive order that would end the practice of bestowing U.S. citizenship onto babies born in the U.S. to non-citizen parents, a move almost certain to draw legal challenges on constitutional grounds.

In an interview with Axios on Monday, Trump said that he had discussed the idea with the White House counsel and that “it’s in the process, it will happen, with an executive order.”

Such an order would seek to override the 14th Amendment, which reads in part: “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside.”

Some immigration hardliners have argued that the 14th Amendment is not applicable to those not in the U.S. legally or here only on a temporary visa. Trump, who has long promised to end birthright citizenship, told Axios that instead of amending the Constitution, he has been advised that his administration could end the practice through executive order.

This will surely be tested in court.

But Trump doesn’t care.

He campaigned on cracking down on illegal immigration and he is doing everything in his power to follow through.

You may also like...

83 Responses

  1. Maria Haluapo-Birchard says:

    Exactly! Get those ppl out of here. I can’t go anywhere without literallly running into them and that damn spanish they speak is so loud and so long that it piercing my ears! So please, We gave them so many priviledges to use, and what they done? They have presented us with drive -by shootings, illigal drugs, guns and blocks of where they are so packed with those nasty ppl, that law enforcement that won’t go near them, they’d rather go home! We allow them in, to use our priviledges, and they try to scare the ppl of this great Country and they’re getting away it. Please, Get that wall built and take the babies with them! Theyll grow up just to be another one of those filthy ppl. They have to get them outta here . To me, physical oppurtunnities are a good thing. To each and every one of them!

  2. Myron Mcphate says:

    “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and the State wherein they reside.”

    Babies born to illegal alien mothers within U.S. borders are called anchor babies because under the 1965 immigration Act, they act as an anchor that pulls the illegal alien mother and eventually a host of other relatives into permanent U.S. residency. (Jackpot babies is another term).

    The United States did not limit immigration in 1868 when the Fourteenth Amendment was ratified. Thus there were, by definition, no illegal immigrants and the issue of citizenship for children of those here in violation of the law was nonexistent. Granting of automatic citizenship to children of illegal alien mothers is a recent and totally inadvertent and unforeseen result of the amendment and the Reconstructionist period in which it was ratified.

    Free! Post-Civil War reforms focused on injustices to African Americans. The 14th Amendment was ratified in 1868 to protect the rights of native-born Black Americans, whose rights were being denied as recently-freed slaves. It was written in a manner so as to prevent state governments from ever denying citizenship to blacks born in the United States. But in 1868, the United States had no formal immigration policy, and the authors therefore saw no need to address immigration explicitly in the amendment.

    Senator Jacob Howard worked closely with Abraham Lincoln in drafting and passing the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which abolished slavery. He also served on the Senate Joint Committee on Reconstruction, which drafted the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. In 1866, Senator Jacob Howard clearly spelled out the intent of the 14th Amendment by stating:

    “Every person born within the limits of the United States, and subject to their jurisdiction, is by virtue of natural law and national law a citizen of the United States. This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners, aliens, who belong to the families of ambassadors or foreign ministers accredited to the Government of the United States, but will include every other class of persons. It settles the great question of citizenship and removes all doubt as to what persons are or are not citizens of the United States. This has long been a great desideratum in the jurisprudence and legislation of this country.”

    This understanding was reaffirmed by Senator Edward Cowan, who stated:

    “[A foreigner in the United States] has a right to the protection of the laws; but he is not a citizen in the ordinary acceptance of the word…”

    The phrase “subject to the jurisdiction thereof” was intended to exclude American-born persons from automatic citizenship whose allegiance to the United States was not complete. With illegal aliens who are unlawfully in the United States, their native country has a claim of allegiance on the child. Thus, the completeness of their allegiance to the United States is impaired, which therefore precludes automatic citizenship.The correct interpretation of the 14th Amendment is that an illegal alien mother is subject to the jurisdiction of her native country, as is her baby.

    Over a century ago, the Supreme Court appropriately confirmed this restricted interpretation of citizenship in the so-called “Slaughter-House cases” [83 US 36 (1873) and 112 US 94 (1884)]13. In the 1884 Elk v.Wilkins case12, the phrase “subject to its jurisdiction” was interpreted to exclude “children of ministers, consuls, and citizens of foreign states born within the United States.” In Elk, the American Indian claimant was considered not an American citizen because the law required him to be “not merely subject in some respect or degree to the jurisdiction of the United States, but completely subject to their political jurisdiction and owing them direct and immediate allegiance.”

    The Court essentially stated that the status of the parents determines the citizenship of the child. To qualify children for birthright citizenship, based on the 14th Amendment, parents must owe “direct and immediate allegiance” to the U.S. and be “completely subject” to its jurisdiction. In other words, they must be United States citizens.

    Congress subsequently passed a special act to grant full citizenship to American Indians, who were not citizens even through they were born within the borders of the United States. The Citizens Act of 1924, codified in 8USCSß1401, provides that:

    The following shall be nationals and citizens of the United States at birth:
    (a) a person born in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof;
    (b) a person born in the United States to a member of an Indian, Eskimo, Aleutian, or other aboriginal tribe.

    In 1898, the Wong Kim Ark Supreme Court case10,11, 16 once again, in a ruling based strictly on the 14th Amendment, concluded that the status of the parents was crucial in determining the citizenship of the child. The current misinterpretation of the 14th Amendment is based in part upon the presumption that the Wong Kim Ark ruling encompassed illegal aliens. In fact, it did not address the children of illegal aliens and non-immigrant aliens, but rather determined an allegiance for legal immigrant parents based on the meaning of the word domicil(e). Since it is inconceivable that illegal alien parents could have a legal domicile in the United States, the ruling clearly did not extend birthright citizenship to children of illegal alien parents. Indeed, the ruling strengthened the original intent of the 14th Amendment.

    The original intent of the 14th Amendment was clearly not to facilitate illegal aliens defying U.S. law and obtaining citizenship for their offspring, nor obtaining benefits at taxpayer expense. Current estimates indicate there may be between 300,000 and 700,000 anchor babies born each year in the U.S., thus causing illegal alien mothers to add more to the U.S. population each year than immigration from all sources in an average year before 1965. (See consequences.)

    American citizens must be wary of elected politicians voting to illegally extend our generous social benefits to illegal aliens and other criminals.

  3. Alfred Kneer says:

    FredK … I Can not understand why that senile old woman Pelosi and her partner in crime crybaby Schumer, would allow thousands of people invade our country. This is total idiocy. Build the wall now and stop this ant-America policy.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: